Radon and Lake Tahoe: Homebuyers and Sellers Guide page 32

EPA Guide to Radon
Home Buyer's and Seller's Guide to Radon
Page 32

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EPA Guide to Radon p.32

Home Buyer's and Seller's Guide to Radon is a publication by the Environmental Protection Agency. Used with permission under public domain and creative commons. Usage: Category Education; License: Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed)

On this page: MYTH #6: Radon is only a problem in certain parts of the country.

FACT: High radon levels have been found in every state. Radon problems do vary from area to area, but the only way to know a home's radon level is to test.

MYTH #7: A neighbor's test result is a good indication of whether your home has a radon problem.

FACT: It is not. Radon levels vary from home to home. The only way to know if your home has a radon problem is to test it.

MYTH #8: Everyone should test their water for radon.

FACT: While radon gets into some homes through the water, it is important to first test the air in the home for radon. If your water comes from a public water system that uses ground water, call your water supplier. If high radon levels are found and the home has a private well, call the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791 for information on testing your water. Also, call your state radon office for more information about radon in air.

MYTH #9: It is difficult to sell a home where radon problems have been discovered.

FACT: Where radon problems have been fixed, home sales have not been blocked.

The added protection will be a good selling point.

MYTH #10: I have lived in my home for so long, it does not make sense to take action now.

FACT: You will reduce your risk of lung cancer when you reduce radon levels, even if you have lived with an elevated radon level for a long time.

MYTH#11: Short-term tests cannot be used for making a decision about whether to reduce the home's high radon levels.

FACT: Short-term tests can be used to decide whether to reduce the home's high radon levels. However, the closer the short-term testing result is to 4 pCi/L, the less certainty there is about whether the home's year-round average is above or below that level. Keep in mind that radon levels below 4 pCi/L still pose some risk and that radon levels can be reduced to 2 pCi/L or below in most homes.

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How to Find Out if You Have Radon

Corentium radon detector
We like this Corentium Home Radon Detector, because it's portable, lightweight, easy to use and powered by 3 AAA batteries.

We give this glowing review of the Corentium Radon Detector, becase we've used this unit for over 5 years. It's been reliable and accurate for detecting Radon levels in our home and office. It's definitely recommended for monitoring Radon. And, if you do Radon mitigation, it can help you to continuously monitor and keep your Radon levels down. Check it out on Amazon, where you can read other reviews and get your best price.


Get your own hardcopy of this Home Buyer's and Seller's Guide to Radon publication by the Environmental Protection Agency. Used with permission under public domain and creative commons. Usage: Category Education; License: Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed)